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20121101
20121130
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KQED (PBS) 28
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Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >> he already has it. >> new >> new hampshire, virgin, florida, ohio, wisconsin, colorado, nevada, and if you put that through the grinder, you come out with one state, ohio. is that true? but you have nevada which is leaning towards obama and wisconsin is still leaning towards obama. ohio, is my view, is in dispense able. >> where did you read that nevada is leaning towards obama. >> i haven't seen a poll are romney leading first. it's one-third hispanic, and this heavily unionized. >> i have people there and they don't think that at all. >> that's the wrong neighborhood. >> here's the point i want to make. the polls today are regarded at microscopically perfect, you and i know, say ten years ago when you were still doing this show because of your tenacity, and because of my leniency. >> 0 years ago. >> 20 years ago, 30, polls were regarded as a rock makes, these polls today have -- as approximation, these polls today are -- >> there is money to be made. >> one or two -- [ talking over one another ] >> i hate to see this come to an end. >> polls are not that precise. >> if they w
" there are seven states currently considered by the associated press to be true toss ups: nevada, colorado, iowa, ohio, virginia, florida and new hampshire. it shows each candidate's quickest potential path to 270 electoral votes. including one scenario giving president obama a path to victory, winning nevada and ohio, to get to 277 electoral votes. for mitt romney the path could also lead through ohio, and blanketing the south, to get to 281 in a different scenario. and there are also several potentials for a tie. this one shows the president losing nevada but winning ohio, to get to 269 for both candidates. and late today, the "newshour" got word that romney will make a last-minute stop in pennsylvania over the weekend. we explore the race and the states in play with jonathan martin of politico and margaret talev of bloomberg news. welcome to you both. so let me start with you, jonathan. the president's back on the trail today. what is the state of this race? how do two campaigns see it? >> both are projecting confidence because that's what you do when you're four days out from election day, j
in colorado. but the president is doing well in iowa an nevada with the early vote which tells us a little bit how this thing is starting to break. >> we close this evening with this question what is the impact of the digital revolution on books, writers and publishing. joining me ken auletta, tim o reilly, jonathan safran foer an jane frieman. >> i like the idea of ebooks how they can democratize books. ma what i am afraid of is on platforms that have distracks an are inherently fast makes it harder to make books books. >> it is so important to have historical perspective. you know what we consider the book today is a relatively recent historical phenomenon. i totally disagree that homer would recognize the book. you know actually we probably more recognize the ebook. >> rose: hurricane sandy, politics and publishing when we continue. >> funding for charlie rose was provided by the following: captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> this has been a difficult week for the city of new york four days after hurricane sandy made landfa
at wisconsin nevada and new hampshire and they think those states are in their column. they're incredibly confident as of this moment that they look at ohio and that's the next highest level of confidence they have what mark said is right. they feel the bain ads did damage to romney. we're going to look back one day on the fact that governor romney wrote his op-ed in the "new york times" that said "let detroit go bankrupt." he wrote that op-ed in november of 2008 right at the end of -- right after the presidential campaign in 2008, long before he was an announced candidate and it could been the most important thing to his detriment that he did. he did it almost four years ago but it's been very hard for him to overcome that. it's also the case that ohio is different in the sense that the white working class voters in ohio are more unionized than any other state in the country and what we're seeing across the midwest is that white working class voters in the northwest the rust belt are just different in terms of their attitude towards president obama than white working class voters in the
wisconsin, paul ryan's home state, hold nevada, they could lose all other swing states, lose the congressional district in maine and come out with exactly 270 electoral votes. gwen: you add it up that way, john? >> that sounds very powerful. what i am struck by is there hasn't been any mystery about this. if you go further than a year ago, president obama's team was very straightforward. they expected it was going to be mitt romney. they were going to make him very unacceptable. the wealthy and out of touch background. they did that. they had a micro targeted micromessage strategy. they said what they were going to do. and stuck to that strategy seems to be with remarkable discipline. if it works, they look really, really smart. the difference between being really smart and really dumb -- [laughter] >> what's remarkable is that they broadcast that, right? >> and the romney campaign never -- or his allies never came up to say, boy, if they're going to do this we should probably define mitt romney. we better define him positively because they're going to dumb all this stuff --
, colorado, and nevada. so, the left and the right of the party and all of its wings made -- made mistakes in choosing candidates. romney was not a great candidate. he came out of the open primary process. it was the only one in the field to was remotely presidential and that is why he got the nomination. >> president obama to 71% of the hispanic vote. if you were taking a look at the republican party, would you not start with them, mark? >> i would. i would also start with the asian vote. republican party is increasingly an older, wider, mail party. -- older, whiter, male party. the republican base is moving from its own home to the rest come to the funeral home. and the democratic base is moving from their room, maybe eventually to a home of their own. that is the difference between the two parties. >> there was a statistic that was just incredible. if you look at the white vote from 10 years ago, it was 81%. now it is down to 72%. we are headed to a very different country and the republican party thinks if they just repackage themselves -- even on immigration -- it will be ok. >> recent
wants. we have this report from nevada. >> are these the first signs of recovery for the construction industry in las vegas? it is not what it seems. she is not building, she is toward writing. there is plenty of land and spare machinery for a business renting diggers by the hour. >> it is sad the way the construction industry died. it was overnight. nobody expected it. i think people are waiting it out, but i think people are all looking for other avenues rather than stay in construction. i think there are reinventing themselves right now because they have to. >> down the road, another far less glamorous site of vegas, a free food line. here.jackie's first time she lost her house and everything in a just two years before the mortgage was all. michael is well qualified, but surviving. he's putting his passion into the pawn shop. >> fortunately, i was able to put on my music equipment. now have to do something for december. i have to save up money. it is difficult. >> it will get worse. unless the new the reelected president and political leaders on both sides agree on a plan to stop t
for democrats. virginia, montana are important if the democrats could pick off arizona or nevada. but things have been breaking for the democrats the past couple of weeks, i think. >> brown: you haven't had a chance to talk about missouri. >> missouri is a very interesting state where democrats hadn't been earning more than 50% of the votes even when winning because there were other factors. and and there is a third party candidate helping her a little bit. one interesting thing about deb fisher, it's the first time nebraska is sending a woman to the senate. and in new hampshire, the associated press called the democratic governor won there. she will be the only female democratic governor in the country next year because she's won. >> yes. >> brown: is that something you didn't know? did we stump you? >> there is a sitting woman democratic governor right now, but she chose not to seek reelection in north carolina. >> right, so in 2013. >> brown: and back to you, glen and judy. >> ifill: we find it very interesting to see how all this is shaking out partly because we see what's happening on t
on this map is go ahead and take a look. you can see california has 9.7% unemployment. nevada has 11.2%. florida has 8.6%. you can go dive in on a state-by-state level as well. finally we've also got a lot of demographic data in here. this, for example, is a breakdown as how the country looks by ethnicity. the more pink, the larger hispanic population. new mexico has 46%. texas has 37%. these are just some of the data sets. whether it's demographic or economic or historical or a little bit of context that you like from the newshour so much. we'll be back. >> ifill: we'll be playing with those maps all night. we can't wait. all of those factors will play into state and local races across this country. back to jeff now now for a closer look at the house and senate contest on radar tonight. >> brown: still with me are christina bellantoni and stuart rothenberg. let's set the big-picture scene on the senate side. of course it's about control in both houses, right? >> sure, it is. at the beginning of this cycle, republicans felt confident that they might be able to win the necessary seats
marching on. >> what you are talking about, odette, in two swing states, nevada and colorado, is going to be the key. i've been to those states. early, get out the vote, among the latino grass roots activists there, it's huge. and that could give president obama the margin there. >> belva: women, gender. >> women, you know, we had this week sandra fluke here in the bay area. reproductive rights activists. look, women have been for obama, he's enjoyed this gender gap for a long time. and in the last couple of weeks, romney has managed to shave that down, very concerning to the reproductive rights groups and they've really been working this vote all over the country and the fact is that they tracked what they say is about 5 million women who they call obama defectors who may go to the other side, go to mitt romney and that could be a key margin in some of these swing states. >> he's got ads out there that suggest he's not going to be activist on that issue. you're right about the issue of obama care for a lot of women. birth control is an economic issue. and that's one of the things demo
the issues in the demographics, let's talk about technology, too. when you talk about -- i went to nevada, i went to colorado, to see the get out the vote effort, the obama team, and it was in social media, even in the last hours of this election, there were californians on the phones, getting e-mails from the campaign, making phone calls with touch screen, i mean, this is beyond what anyone had ever seen and the republicans were just washed out when -- >> in 2008, the turnout was not an anomaly. they got the turnout again. they were able to get everybody out. >> belva: jill, you were with the old guy that got a few mir kms, too. what was the passage of proposition 30 mean to educators and children? >> well, in california, that sound you heard was the collective sigh of relief of 400,000 teachers on election night, that they are not going to have these trigger cuts. and jerry brown pushed that through. it did not look good prior to election day, but i will say, in california, the unions, like in some other states, made a big difference for the democrats and -- >> the youth vote made a huge d
. within a few years you have swing state, maybe not even swing state, new mexico, nevada, texas starts becoming a swing state. >> a blue state. >> the trends are so damn obvious, but they walk the other way. >> woodruff: so the campaign, the rest of the campaign, mark, jobs numbers out today. but how doe this fit in and where does this stand. >> don't pop the champagne. we're a long way from five percent but i mean the jobs numbers were better than expected which is always good. and they were increased from both august and september. they were higher. and with rising house prices, home prices, and confidence and optimistic index being highest, the hghest in five years, this is all encouraging news. i mean it's not determinive news but all encouraging news for an incumbent. >> woodruff: does it affect the campaign, do you think? >> i'm not sure the last jobs numbers have a huge effect. in 1992 george h.w. bush had bigger jobs numbers. he had really significant growth. people used the economy had will be been locked. nonetheless the last couple of weeks of the campaign, you have to say t
of stops in nevada, colorado, and iowa. romney's day won't end until midnight after an election eve rally in manchester, new hampshire. >> woodruff: late monday in a surprise move romney announced he will hit the trail one final time tomorrow touching down on election day in both pennsylvania and ohio. margaret talked with romney's communications director, gail gitcho, about the campaign's micro-targeting "get out the vote" effort, called the orca project, named for the killer whale. find that video online. >> ifill: coming up, we'll have much more on the end to the campaign, including the final push in ohio; state of the race analysis from rothenberg, page, and kohut; voter access to polling places, and initiatives on the ballot; plus, the slow recovery after the storm, and a day in the life of a hard-hit brooklyn neighborhood. but first, with the other news of the day, here's hari sreenivasan. >> woodruff: the violence in syria swept up a new group today. fighting raged near a palestinian refugee camp in southern damascus. activists said palestinian radicals supporting the syrian govern
, may have given them the margin of victory in colorado, nevada, and virginia glaen glen when the latino voters turned out, 71% of them voted for the president. ray suarez, thank you for all your good work from chicago. >> suarez: thanks a lot, gwen. >> woodruff: we'll devote much of the rest of the program to the events of last night and the coming days including what worked and what didn't; what the voters endorsed what's ahead in the president's second term. plus, shields and brooks. but first, the other news of the day. here's hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: wall street had its worst day of the year, amid worries about continuing divided government in washington and bad news out of europe. the dow jones industrial average lost nearly 313 points to close at 12,932. the nasdaq fell 74 points to close at 2,937. for more on what happened, i spoke earlier with economist hugh johnson, who runs his own investment services company in albany, new york. so, mr. johnson, tell me, how do we distribute the weight of what's pull the market down? is it the fears in europe? is it the fears about t
incident you left washington and you went to nevada. that was for a fund-raiser. that's what they're doing and if you think of that many fund raisers, here's an interesting statistic for you. back in 1984, ronald reagan was incumbent president of the united states. he was running for reelection. his campaign had to raise money for the party even though he was taking the federal grant as everyone has until this year in the general election. ronald reagan attended in that year four fund raisers. >> compared to -- >> 221, so we have a president -- this is not an attack on obama. we have a president who is to some extent, not doing their job because they have to be off fund-raising. the romney people felt the same way. romney was heard to be complaining in his campaign that he couldn't go out and meet voters and do what he thought he had to do as a can at because he had to spend all of his time in closed rooms of wealthy people to fund raise in order to get his ads up for his campaign. he couldn't campaign. there's a great irony here and so you have two issues here. one is the time that the pr
like antiques, so she suggested we go to nevada city, take a little trip, and do some antiquing and have a nice breakfast. and i found this little cradle in an antiques shop. and i love the tin lithography, and also that it has a little dog on it. i'm a dog lover. uh-huh, uh-huh. the price was right, so i decided to buy it. well, what was the price? thirty-two dollars. and how long ago was this? a little over a year ago. wow. well, it is a cradle, and it's a lithograph tin. you have beautiful lithography. lithograph tin started coming into play in the very late part of the 19th and the early part of the 20th century. these are kleinert's waterproof baby pants. and of course it's an advertising piece. it's also a point-of-purchase display piece. that's what they call when they put something right near the cash register. and it would entice people to buy it. oh, okay. and i'm sure that they had the little baby pants here inside the cradle with a picture of the little baby in his waterproof pants to advertise the item. and it actually rocks. it's absolutely a charming thing. now, i
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)